Impressions from ISSE 2010

I’m at the ISSE 2010 this week, which takes places in Berlin this year. I’ll share my impressions on two subjects that were hot (in the first two days, since I write this with one more day to go).

German eID

The ‘hottest’ item is the new German eID card (nPA), which will be issued starting 1 November. This is a ‘normal’ ID card, with an eID contactless chip. Technically the eID function seems to be better than what I’ve seen before, but more interesting for me was the business model behind it, and how they handle privacy.

With respect to the business model, it is interesting that it can be used for consumer-2-business authentication, thus increasing usage beyond citizen-2-government services.  This is for free from the perspective of the relying party (aka service provider). Of course, running a so-called eID server to ‘talk’ to the eID card is not trivial, and much more complicated than becoming e.g. an OpenID relying party. There are companies ready to take care of this on behalf of the relying party, this will of course costs money. Citizen have to pay for the card, but since it is (I think) mandatory to have one …

With respect to the digital signature function, this is not present by default. A citizen has to go to a commercial party for this, i.e., a different business model for the signature function as for the authentication function. Reason seems to be that this is not considered a government responsibility (contrary to authentication/identification), and companies are already offering this as a service (I expect not a lot to consumers though). This probably also means that there will be only very few people that go to this trouble (and costs), and thus little coverage for consumers/citizens.

With respect to privacy: what is interesting is the ability to be a pseudonym-only authentication device, that relying parties need to register and motivate which attributes they want to read, user consent and proof-of-age function that does not reveals ones age. Also interesting is that kids below 16 are not allowed to use it to identify themselves, for privacy reasons I assume (can’t trust those kids to know what they’re doing J).

The Germans life up to their reputation of being privacy-conscious with this new eID card, good for them. When looking at some of the details, they also life up to another reputation of being very sensitive to academic grades: Doktorgrad is a data field for the card… Not sure how important this is for security purposes though, but at least the border control or webshop can properly address “Herr Doktor” J

The big question is now if this takes off with both public and relying parties, and how long this takes. There are examples in other countries that were earlier, where this went very slowly of not at all (e.g., Belgium).

Phishing/malware

There were some, mostly German, talks on phishing and malware. Quite scary actually how this is progressing. Cybercrime seems to become more professional, and is scaling up. I’m a strong believer in “good enough” security, especially when it concerns damage that is ‘only’ money/fraud, contrary to privacy loss. To quote a number, the German government (Bundeskriminalamt) estimates a €17 million fraud for phishing/malware in Germany for online banking for 2010 (with €3500 average damage). This in itself is not a number that surprises me, it is even lower than I expected, but if the growing trend (71% up from last year!) continues the coming years this number will increase quickly. Of course, costs to properly counter these threats, and the userunfriendlyness that often comes with it, are also huge.

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