SIM augmented authentication as alternative for SIM based?

We recently did an assessment of a so-called SIM augmented authentication token, or VASCO’s new DigiPass Nano product to be more specific. We did this for SURFnet, for which we previously also did an assessment of Mobile PKI. We liked Mobile PKI, but it has a big disadvantage: you depend on your mobile network operator to be able to use it (and in the Netherlands they are not deploying this any time soon). This disadvantage is the main motivation to look at SIM augmented tokens. These are, as the term suggests, added to in stead on being ‘inside’ the SIM card.

So what is a SIM augmented authentication token? Physically it is a sticker with an embedded chip that you stick on your SIM card and sits between the SIM card and the mobile phone. The chip stores a secret used for authentication, which is more secure than storing the secret in a ‘normal’ mobile app. This secret is used by an authentication application that is also runs from this chip. This application, from the perspective of the mobile phone, appears to be a normal SIM application, and can work on basically any phone (smart of dumb). The only SIM augmented authentication token that I’m aware of is the above mentioned  DigiPass Nano from VASCO (let me know if you know of others?). The DigiPass Nano implements an event-based one-time-password functionality, i.e., it generated a new code every time the user asks for it.

We did an assessment of the usability, security and business model aspects. Below I copied the conclusions, but the bottom-line is that we believe from a security perspective this is a good alternative to other one-time-password solutions, and it more secure than solutions implemented as a mobile app. The main benefit is that it works on basically any phone (also non-smartphones), and you you can deploy it without needing help (and investments) from your mobile operator. The main disadvantage is the user experience. We did some limited testing with putting the sticker on, which was ok, but the user experience of getting a one-time-password can be troublesome. It requires the user to find SIM applications on their mobile phone, which are often hidden somewhere deep in the menu’s. My estimate is that this usability limitation will need to be addressed for this technology to get acceptance beyond specific enterprise use-cases. Or to put it differently, I’d do very carefull usability optimizations/testing before deploying this to millions of consumers.

This assessment was joint work with my colleague Martijn Oostdijk, see his blog for more details on especially the security aspect. The full report of our assessment is available via the SURFnet website. If you’re looking for a wider perspective on the combination of mobile and digital identity, see this previous blog post on our mobile-centric identity vision.

6 Conclusions

The Digipass Nano uses a form factor that is relatively unique in the authentication token market. It is a SIM augmented token, a thin patch/sticker including an embedded chip that sits between the SIM and the user’s mobile phone. The key advantages of this form factor are:

  • secure storage of credentials under a “security domain” that is distinct from the other stake holders (e.g. mobile operators, handset vendors),
  • while at the same time the ability to use the user-interface of the user’s existing GSM handset,
  • and, potentially, the use of the mobile phone’s GSM or 3G network.

As most users will always carry their mobile phone with them, this means that the token will be present during transactions in many different contexts.

The technology underlying SIM augmentation is based on standards that have existed for a long time, are present in billions of GSM handsets around the world, and have proven to be relatively secure given the threat landscape thus far. The DP Nano does not use all features offered by this technology (it only uses the user interface features, not, e.g., the network features present in GSM 11.14). However, a number of variations of the DP Nano exist (see [10], apparently targeting different markets) which do utilise the networking capabilities of the GSM SIM, and which appear to more strongly bind the token to either handset (“IMEI lock”) or SIM (“IMSI lock”).

On paper, from a technological and security perspective, SIM augmented tokens compare well to other mobile and possession based tokens such as SMS OTP, OTP tokens, mobile soft tokens, and smart cards. As to the security, threats from malware on the handset are minimal as long as the SIM toolkit API interface is properly implemented on the handset.

The user experience may cause some problems for certain groups of users, depending on the issuance and installation process (e.g. whether users are required to install the token themselves). The DP Nano requires the user to navigate through unfamiliar text based menus in order to start up the application when asked by the SP to provide an OTP. This is the most prominent drawback when compared to e.g. the Mobile PKI experience (as described in [8]) where the authentication application on the handset it triggered over the air.

From a business model perspective SIM augmented tokens are interesting as they separate the role of SIM based authentication provider from the role of MNO. Obviously, being the first of its kind and relying on a server side licensing model and proprietary implementation, whether a choice for the DP Nano provides a positive business case when compared to MNO provided SIM based authentication remains to be seen.

Interesting features to add could be:

  • Lock the token to IMSI or IMEI (possible, according to [10])
  • Use the network to initiate authentication transactions (drawback: implies sending service SMS messages to the token, which may mean cooperation of a MNO or at least per-transaction costs)
  • Use the network as an OOB channel during an authentication session (e.g. to display transaction details, similar drawback as above)
  • Use the network to “blacklist” a token when a token is reported stolen
  • Combine SIM augmented solution with a handset resident application to provide a better user experience (may be dependent on operating system and handset to provide installed apps with an API for communication with SIM)

The latter option is particularly attractive as a way to enhance the security of SURFnet’s tiqr solution (see [11]) and other mobile app solutions.

Since a one-size-fits-all solution to authentication does not exist, in the end SIM augmented solutions will likely find a market alongside authentication tokens with different form factors.

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